Japanese IO

https://www.japanese.io/

This is a site that lets you paste texts that you want to read and add ruby to the kanji or look up meanings of the words.
If you come up against a word you don't understand, you can look it up right there and keep on reading.

  • With just a click, you can check the readings and meanings.
  • Practice your reading comprehension.
  • Save the text in your library so you can read it any time you like.
  • Anyone with a Facebook or Google account can log in.

How to...


Log in and see how it works.
There are five items on the menu - "Search", "New text", "Suggest text", "Library", and "Vocabulary".



In "Search", you can look up Japanese vocabulary and their meanings using hiragana, katakana, kanji, romaji, or English.



Click the "kanji" (blue box) on the card to see the individual kanji, their readings and meanings.
The "examples" (green box) will show you sample sentences using that word.



In "New text", you can paste Japanese texts such as newspaper articles and novels, to read as you look up meanings.



When you click the "start reading" button, you will see a ruby icon and a pencil icon to the left of the writing. Use the ruby icon (blue box) to add ruby to all of the kanji in the writing.
Check the reading for only the word you want to, by moving the cursor to that word.
Use the pencil icon (red box) to edit the material you pasted.



When you don't recognize a kanji mid-sentence, click on it and a card will appear. (See image)



Show all of the words you looked up with the SHOW LOOKED-UP WORDS button.
In "Suggest text", you can read short texts from news articles.
Use it the same way as "New text".
Click the ADD TO LIBRARY button, if you see a text you want to keep. You can read it again and delete it later.



"Vocabulary" is a wordbook that records all of the words you looked up.
You can display the cards by words you looked up today, yesterday, this week, or this month and by words you looked up most recently or ones you looked up most.



You can display the cards by words you looked up today, yesterday, this week, or this month and by words you looked up most recently or ones you looked up most.

Last update 2018.06.29