Use Google in your Japanese studies!

I think Google is probably the first port of call for lots of people when they want to look something up.
Google is certainly a very convenient search engine.
However, that's not all you can use it for.
Google can be useful when studying Japanese too!


For example, you can try using Google when you're looking for an example sentence including a particular word or expression.
Enter that vocabulary/expression as a search, and any pieces of writing from the internet where the search engine finds those terms will be displayed for you.



In the same way, this can be a really useful tool if you have an expression or a sentence you have written yourself in Japanese that you aren't sure about, and you want to know if your grammar is correct.
Simply copy and paste what you want to check into the Google search box.
If the phrase you entered appears a number of times in the search results given, you can feel quite confident that the expression you used was OK!



I know this much already!


One more thing.
Sometimes you find Japanese words that have the same pronunciation but are written using different kanji for different uses, don't you?
Take, for example, '上げる' and '挙げる'.
Both are read as 'あげる (ageru)'.
However, which kanji do you use for '手をあげる'? How about '成果をあげる'?

In this case, you can enter the two terms '上げる 挙げる' into Google, then search.
Then you can probably expect to find some pages among the search results explaining the differences in usage.



There is actually a blog article that explains how to use Google in these ways.
It's called 10 Ways to Hack Google to Become an Awesome Japanese Learning Resource, and can be found on the Tofugu website.



Here, some ideas and clever ways to use Google and its features, such as Google Image Search, or Google Voice, are introduced.
The author has brought together 10 of them for you to peruse! Wow!


There is a page called Google で、できること(Explore Google Search), which also explains how to use the Google search engine.


Various uses are introduced in Japanese.

Last update 2010.07.06

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